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We need sustainable coverage of what’s happening in Ferguson, Missouri. Back this project, and every $500 is one more day reporters can provide ongoing coverage from the scene.

  • 106% funded
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  • 14 days
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  • $4,267 raised
    so far
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At $4,000 Journalists on Beacon can provide sustainable reporting you won't get anywhere else.

Backers to this project have already enabled a full week of coverage. See all the stories here, and let’s keep this going.

With your help, we’ve rallied enough support for seven days of coverage. Help keep it going. Every additional $500 is one more day freelance journalists can be on the ground.

Already, journalists on Beacon are creating original, first-hand coverage. Mariah Stewart takes you inside a protest:

The reporting you enabled her to do in Ferguson was featured on BBC World News.

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When you pledge, here’s what you enable reporters to create:

✓ Your funding enables reporters on Beacon to publish firsthand coverage as news unfolds. Your contributions directly support their ability to remain on the scene, even as the mainstream media’s attention shifts elsewhere.

✓ Ongoing reporting of the larger issues at play in Ferguson.

✓ Access to the entire network of journalists on Beacon.

Ongoing coverage is crucial. Help us do what mainstream media can’t.

On August 9, police in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Missouri, shot and killed an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown. Since then, protests have erupted and citizens have clashed with police over the incident. According to media reports, protesters were met with tear gas and rubber bullets.

Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 1.10.09 PM.png

Via Twitter

Social media tells us readers want more reporting about what’s happening in Ferguson.

There are eyewitnesses on the ground who can share their experiences, and people who can trace the shooting’s aftermath and impact on the community.

You can help make that coverage happen by supporting reporters on the ground who can tell these stories. The more help they get, the deeper these writers can go — and the more voices that can join in and tell the story.

Your support will allow local reporters to follow the story, and continue to do so long after the mainstream media moves on to other news.

Back this project now →

What happens next?

August 23 at 2:11 am

Because of you, we were able to fund more than a week of coverage from Ferguson. And we’re not done yet — Peter Tinti is working on a larger story to put what he saw during his five nights in Ferguson in perspective.

Peter in Ferguson

Peter Tinti reporting on the ground in Ferguson, Missouri.

We’ll send you it as soon as its ready. And until then, you can revisit all the coverage here.

You’ve inspired a fellowship program.

Because of your direct support, Mariah Stewart received an offer from The Huffington Post for a full-time fellowship in Ferguson. She’ll work closely for a whole year with The Huffington Post’s Ryan Reilly to cover the ongoing federal investigation into the killing of Michael Brown. Together, they’ll report on the activity of local and county police forces, long after the mainstream media returns home.

You can see more about the fellowship here, or watch an interview with Mariah and the Huffpost’s Ryan Grim:

Mariah on HuffPost Live

Mariah on Huffington Post Live

Contribute to Mariah’s fellowship here.

You’ve supported writers directly.

You provided nearly $4500 in direct support to journalists on the ground. Today, you’ll receive an invitation to login to Beacon. In exchange for your support, you’ll become a subscriber of Mariah Stewart so you can continue to read her work into the future. You’ll also have access to every story by every writer on Beacon.


No break in Ferguson.

August 20 at 7:05 am

The TV play-by-play of Ferguson protests misses the personal stories of actual protestors. Peter Tinti, a journalist you funded, has been recording their narratives. Some, like this mother of an active-duty soldier, are particularly poignant:

Her sign reads: “My son’s life is valuable when protecting this country abroad, but has no value here at home. #JusticeforMikeBrown”

With so much attention now focused on Ferguson, Peter’s been concentrating on finding the larger message. Expect an in-depth piece from him on Beacon in the coming day.

We don’t need peace — we need unrest

Jeff Chu, an editor-at-large at Fast Company and a Beacon contributor, wanted to find out how protests are affecting religious communities in Ferguson.

“I want you to pray for justice. I want you to pray for reconciliation. I want you to pray for restoration,” pastor Traci Blackmon told Chu. “But I don’t want you to pray for peace. We don’t need peace right now—we need unrest.”

If that seems like a strange sentiment coming from a pastor, Chu says there’s a precedent for it. Parts of biblical scripture warn against a “false peace,” and some sermons in Ferguson are exploring what that means. Read the full story here.

You’ve started an international conversation

The world’s taken notice of the journalism you enabled in Ferguson. Just today, two articles came out exploring this project and what it portends for the future of journalism. In the United Kingdom, they’re saying you filled in the gaps in reporting. And in New York, they’re already wondering whether crowdfunding can save the news business. (We think it can!)

There’s more coverage to come

In addition to continuing coverage from Peter and more photographs from Raffe Lazarian, we’ll be releasing some new initiatives to make sure you stay informed about Ferguson for the next year. Stay tuned!

A standoff against police on August 19.

If you want to enable more coverage like this, please consider making another pledge or let your friends know about this project. Share this link: https://www.beaconreader.com/projects/ferguson-missouri


You Shoot, We Shoot Back

August 18 at 11:03 am

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon ordered a state of emergency and implemented a midnight curfew in an attempt to restore order. Peter Tinti, a reporter you funded, was on the scene. Instead of staying put in the designated media section, he embedded himself in the protests until 4am. He was able to capture some amazingly raw and powerful footage that you wouldn’t see anywhere else.

Thank you for this funding this coverage on Beacon.

Read the full dispatch from the first curfew: You Shoot, We Shoot Back

Community Leaders and the Curfew

Interview with Ferguson Community Members Shortly Before the Curfew

Community leaders are placed in an awkward situation. They are disturbed by the thought of being forced inside by midnight on a Saturday — but don’t want anyone to get hurt. The most they can do is inform people of the curfew and ask them to exercise caution. Watch this video →

A Frustrated Ferguson Resident Confronts the Police Minutes Before Midnight

A Frustrated Ferguson Resident Confronts the Police Minutes Before Midnight

A resident waited until most of the protestors cleared out to have a clear line of sight with the police — she wanted to tell them her story. This is an extremely powerful segment that touches on racial profiling and the chain of repercussions she and her son faced after he “resisted arrest.” Watch this video →

Local Activists Discuss the Best Way to Respond to the Curfew

Local Activists Discuss the Best Way to Respond to the Curfew

Local activist Paul Muhammed speaks with people on West Florissant Avenue, encouraging them to obey the curfew on account of their own safety, and to come back tomorrow morning to protest. “We’re not going to let our people be mishandled, and we aren’t going to let our people mishandle them. We’re going to police ourselves and we are going to take it back to how it used to be in our own communities.” Watch this video →

See more footage and photos…

Read the full dispatch from the first curfew

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon ordered a state of emergency and implemented a midnight curfew in an attempt to restore order. Though many of the protestors returned home as midnight approached, a few hundred stayed defiance of the curfew. Here are photos and video from the standoff that ensued:

You Shoot, We Shoot Back: Notes From First Curfew in Ferguson

More coverage

We have enough funding to keep Peter on the ground until Tuesday.

If you want to enable more coverage like this, please consider making another pledge or let your friends know about this project https://www.beaconreader.com/projects/ferguson-missouri


Night #8: A struggle against curfew

August 17 at 6:19 am

It’s shaping up to be a more contentious evening in Ferguson, as police try to enforce a new curfew against protestors. Peter Tinti, a journalist you funded, is on the scene:

Tweet from Tinti

You can follow Peter’s coverage live on Twitter, and in the morning, expect the full recap on Beacon. Your funding enables Peter to produce daily summaries to put the events in Ferguson in context so that you can understand what’s happening on the ground.

For example, while most media coverage centered on a lull in violence last night, Peter stayed out past 4 AM and discovered looting at Ferguson Market and Liquor:

Looted Ferguson Market and Liquor

Certain protestors continue with bold challenges against the police. Peter reports:

“As 4 am approached, the police dismounted from their vehicles and formed a line across the street. At one point, a car sped toward them, breaking only 50 yards short of the police position. It appeared for a moment that the drive was poised to charge through the police line and that the officers were ready to open fire. Protest leaders immediately rushed the vehicle and convinced the driver to turn around.”

To read the full dispatch, click here.

A reminder: You can see all of the past stories and dispatches you’ve help fund here →

Thank you for helping to make this coverage possible. You should share the project if you want more coverage: https://www.beaconreader.com/projects/ferguson-missouri


A problem

August 16 at 7:25 am

Thank you for backing on-the-ground coverage from Ferguson. So far you’ve enabled 3 local reporters and a photographer to provide continuous coverage, and enabled Peter Tinti, an experienced conflict reporter to be flown in from the east coast.

A problem with the press conference

The Ferguson Police Department held a press conference today during which they disclosed the name of the police officer who shot unarmed teen Michael Brown on August 9.

Alleged video of Mike Brown

Security camera surveillance stills released by police Friday morning show a suspect, believed to be Brown, forcing a store employee out of his way before exiting the unidentified convenience store

The much-anticipated press conference sparked outrage, however, when Ferguson police chief Tom Jackson chose to make Brown’s alleged participation in an unarmed robbery of a convenience store the focal point of the event instead of the police officer’s use of fatal force.

Reactions from community leaders and the police

Peter Tinti was able to get a video interview with one of the most important community leaders throughout the protests, Antonio French — an elected official in St. Louis whose tweets and videos have offered a first hand glimpse into the protests.

Antonio French

Antonio was very hopeful after the peace last night, but believes the police mishandled and made the situation on the ground worse by releasing information that wasn’t related to the actual shooting of Michael Brown.

As well as a high ranking member of the police force, Major Ronnie Robinson, Commander of North Patrol.

Major Ronnie Robinson

He discusses the need to remind frustrated Ferguson residents that a “transparent” and “meticulous” investigation into the killing of Michael Brown will take time.

Peter also spoke with Jerroll Sanders who believes we need to stay focused on what she believes are the real issues regarding Michael Brown’s death — The officer’s ability to act as the jury, the judge, and the executioner.

Looting and Molotov Cocktails make an appearance tonight after last night’s peaceful protests

Peter

4-5 business had door glass broken by looters but protestors quickly blocked the entrance and stopped the looters.

Stories published since last update:

Voices from West Florissant, Ferguson, Missouri.

Community is strong at the “Youth Speak Up Forum” in Ferguson

A reminder: You can see all of the past stories and dispatches you’ve help fund here →

Thank you for helping to make this coverage possible. You should share the project if you want more coverage: https://www.beaconreader.com/projects/ferguson-missouri


More than 250,000 people have seen the work you've funded.

August 15 at 9:30 pm

This is Houston Gay and he is 103 years old. He marched with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr

In less than 24 hours over 200,000 people have seen this photo taken by Brittany Velasco, a reporter you funded with Beacon.

When most of the media coverage focused on fury, anger and violence, your support let reporters capture an equally important but overlooked moment during the protests.

Retweet this photo


A night of calm.

August 15 at 5:57 pm

Thanks for your backing of on-the-ground coverage from Ferguson. You’ve enabled four reporters and a photographer to provide continuous coverage. Here’s the latest:

Peaceful protests

Imgur

While protestors assembled for the sixth consecutive night, the atmosphere stayed much more peaceful. Peter Tinti found that police presence was much reduced. Representatives from the New Black Panther Party and the Nation of Islam directed traffic, checking vehicles for weapons and urging fellow demonstrators to remain calm.

Revealing the officer’s name

Shortly after 8:30 a.m., Friday morning, Ferguson police chief Tom Jackson identified six-year veteran officer Darren Wilson as the officer involved in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Michael Sprague gives you a summary.

More coverage:

A Peaceful Vigil in St. Louis City

When the Sun Goes Down, the Walls Go Up

The Night Calm Returned to Ferguson

ferguson Photo by Raffe Lazarian

Share this project with your friends, family and networks to show the work you’ve helped fund. Every $500 is one more day reporters can provide ongoing coverage from the scene. http://beaconreader.com/ferguson


Reporter you funded on Beacon was featured by BBC. Protests escalate.

August 14 at 6:45 am

Thank you for backing on-the-ground coverage in Ferguson. Here’s the latest news from the scene that you helped make possible:

A writer you funded was featured on BBC World News

Mariah Stewart was on the scene as police forces began deploying tear gas and shooting rubber bullets. Listen to her on BBC and see what triggered the escalation - watch her video from the protests here. (full story published tomorrow)

A peaceful demonstration by 103 year old who once marched with Dr. Martin Luther King

There were peaceful demonstrations, too, including one by a 103-year-old who marched with Dr. Martin Luther King 50 years ago.

From around the web:

  • Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon broke his silence on the situation by canceling his planned appearances to visit Ferguson on Thursday.

  • There were numerous reports of reporters being arrested as protests intensified.

Here’s What’s Coming Tomorrow:

  • A firsthand of account of what it’s like to be tear-gassed from a reporter on the scene.

  • An interview with a local police officer on the escalating tensions.

Read all the Ferguson dispatches on one page

We’ve created a page where you can read and share all of the coverage you’ve helped fund. http://beaconreader.com/ferguson

Dispatches from today

Share this project with your friends, family and networks to show the work you’ve helped fund. Every $500 is one more day reporters can provide ongoing coverage from the scene. http://beaconreader.com/ferguson


Two civilians shot in separate incidents early Wednesday morning.

August 13 at 5:31 pm

Though there have been reports of shots fired most nights since the officer-involved death of Michael Brown, no civilians have been hit. That changed early on Wednesday morning.

Michael Sprague, one of the reporters you helped to fund, has the details here:

Read the latest update here: https://www.beaconreader.com/michael-sprague/two-civilians-shot-in-separate-incidents-early-wednesday-morning

We’ve hit 100 percent of the goal! Stay tuned for stretch goals, which will enable us to fund even more reporting from the scene.


Panic spreads to wealthier counties as riot rumors swirl on Twitter

August 13 at 8:06 am

Thank you for backing on the ground coverage in Ferguson. Here is the latest overnight update from Missouri that you’ve helped make possible:

Panic reaches St. Charles County →

Read the whole update here: https://www.beaconreader.com/brittany-velasco/panic-reaches-st-charles-county

Summary Points:

Read the whole update here: https://www.beaconreader.com/brittany-velasco/panic-reaches-st-charles-county

PS. We are 93% funded to provide 5 days of independent, on-the-ground coverage. If you share this project with one friend it will be fully funded in no time. http://www.beaconreader.com/projects/ferguson-missouri


A surreal atmosphere in Ferguson

August 13 at 1:20 am

Here is the first piece of on the ground reporting you’ve helped create:

https://www.beaconreader.com/brittany-velasco/who-are-they-and-what-do-they-want

It includes a video of a first-hand encounter with a protest the day after a riot in Ferguson, MO.

It takes place at a burned down QuickTrip gas station. Community members express their thoughts on the shooting of an unarmed teenager, and are confronted by racist taunts.

Watch the video and read the story here: https://www.beaconreader.com/brittany-velasco/who-are-they-and-what-do-they-want

PS. We’re 72 percent of the way to our goal of $2,500, which would support five days of on-the-ground coverage like the reporting above.


When you back something on Beacon, you also get access to every story by every other writer.
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Journalists on Beacon BIOGRAPHY

Beacon is sourcing journalists on the ground to cover this breaking news event.

If you’re on the scene and are interested in becoming a contributor, e-mail hotline@beaconreader.com with a description of your experience, what you’re seeing and the reporting you’ll add.

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